Thursday, August 09, 2007

USDOJ Money Laundering Corporation?

So when did the iron curtain extend on citizens in America or has there always been one?

Bush has suspended the Constitution, eliminated the hallmark of all free societies, habeas corpus, and has suspended free speech, if you speak out about Iraq loudly enough about the criminal acts of the top officials in the US Government, you can be jailed and your property seized.

Woodrow Wilson had his Sedition Act:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sedition_Act_of_1918, Bush and Ashcroft had their Patriot Act which in the computer age is far more dangerous. Good sense is now afraid of the computer. Good sense is afraid to speak.

The USDOJ top officials are allegedly involved in defaulting in trillions of dollars of loans and are profiting from it. The new seizure on rights and the institution of warrantless wiretaps and searches, arrests and confinement without hearings, and the suspension of the Constitution all has a reason.

The official criminals in charge in the US don't want to go to jail, they just want to continue sucking off the world's blood.

Quote: "MANDAMUS COURT SUMMONSES + RETURNS OF SERVICE
HIGH U.S. OFFICIALS AND RICHMOND FED SUMMONSED
Thursday 9 August 2007 15:50

PAULSON, KIMMITT, WILKINSON, CHERTOFF, GONZALES AND FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF RICHMOND HAVE ALL BEEN SERVED AND THEIR RETURNS OF SERVICE FILED ON 27 JULY 2007"

Found here:
http://www.worldreports.org/news/76_mandamus_court_summo


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Alien and Sedition Acts

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Text of the act.
Text of the act.
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The Alien and Sedition Acts were four laws passed by the Federalists in the United States Congress in 1798 during the administration of President John Adams, which was waging an undeclared "war" with France, the Quasi-War. Proponents claimed they were designed to protect the United States from alien citizens of enemy powers and to stop seditious attacks from weakening the government. The Democratic-Republicans, like later historians, attacked them as being both unconstitutional and designed to stifle criticism of the administration, and as infringing on the right of the states to act in these areas. They became a major political issue in the elections of 1798 and 1800. One act (the Alien Enemies Act) is still the law in 2007, and has frequently been enforced in wartime. The others expired or were repealed by 1802. Thomas Jefferson held them all to be unconstitutional and void, and pardoned and ordered the release of all who had been convicted of violating them.

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