Monday, January 07, 2008

Taxpayer funded Crime Waves


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Police pay "informants" money to get bigger fish. Informants allegedly can keep half of drug buy money and half the drugs they buy. Police will even pay their informants $10,000 cash to kill citizens that make police misconduct complaints. [proof]

Excerpt:

If officers actually did their jobs they could see their numbers reduced. So a cop on every corner does little to curb crime if the main agenda is collecting traffic fines, other fees, confiscating money, and property.

It would then make sense to leave the career criminal parasites alone as they cannot be easily found and fined. Instead they are a law enforcement TOOL. An informant can set up innocent, and not so innocent, individuals that do have money and property to take away.

An example of this is Thomas Alcutt, Connecticut Prisoner # 305757, Bergin Correctional Institute, Storrs, Connecticut. Alcutt told me that he had a $200 to $1000 daily crack cocaine habit for a period of years.

Alcutt claimed he broke into countless houses and garages, even when the people were home. Thomas told me he preferred garages as if they were easy to get into and there was usually enough valuables in the garage without having to go into the house, so he had enough goods to sell at a Southern Connecticut pawn shop to fuel his daily addiction. [more]

Was Connecticut's out of control "informant system" a precipitating factor of why I was falsely arrested and railroaded to prison as I wanted to evict prostitutes and have them arrested? [more]

Excerpt:
Phillip Zuckerman, a New London [Connecticut] lawyer, was elected judge in 2006, after spending nearly $18,000 on his campaign. This past summer, Zuckerman's wife and campaign treasurer asked lawyers to donate up to $500 to help pay off their debt.

The fund-raising letters — some sent to lawyers who appear in Zuckerman's courtroom —raise questions about the independence of the Connecticut probate courts, where judges are elected and lawyers who do business in their courts often give generously to their campaigns.

"What's special here is this guy was so clumsy he left tracks," said John Langbein, a Yale Law School professor and frequent critic of the probate system. "Normally these shakedowns don't leave evidence of this quality." [more]

Excerpt from a Hartford Courant piece on Troop G, Connecticut State Police:
The missing items range from paychecks taken from troopers' mail slots to an LED light bar worth $2,000. In some cases, it hasn't been determined whether some items were taken or merely misplaced. Other objects of a more personal nature, such as family photos and nameplates, went missing from the sergeant's office, sources within the department said.

In other cases, a rat trap was left in a trooper's cubby space, and a nameplate was defaced with graffiti.

Though the thefts were discussed in-house, they apparently were not reported to upper management until internal affairs investigators were sent to the barracks in November after a menacing note and a bullet with a sergeant's badge number engraved into it were left in a supervisor's desk drawer. [more]

Sleaze that passes off as Justice. 2 Connecticut Judicial Branch employees blow the whistle on the shenanigans, obstruction of justice, racketeering, and the hostile work environment the Connectucut Judicial Branch is. Connecticut Judicial Misconduct in courts is more the rule than the exception:



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[click here] for Official Connecticut's Domestic spying program:
If you are out protesting or complaining about Connecticut Police Misconduct, is this the goon squad that is out to get your photo and name for the secret Connecticut State Police "Enemies List" where you are a click away from having your life ruined?


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Your medical records, phone calls, finances, home computer, your kids, and police contacting your boss to get you fired is not off limits in Connecticut. Connecticut is a Police State.

Can police officers that put rat traps in each other's mailboxes be trusted to "protect and serve" the public?

[click here] for blogger's fair use of copyrighted materials notice. My email: stevengerickson@yahoo.com

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